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8 Game-Changing Supplements for Natural Blood Pressure Reduction

Chronic hypertension affects a significant number of adults over the age of 30 and tends to worsen with age. Globally, approximately 1.3 billion people suffer from high blood pressure, defined as measurements of 140/90 mmHg or higher. Identifying high blood pressure can be challenging since the symptoms are non-specific, often resembling common ailments like headaches, nausea, fatigue, brain fog, or anxiety. Consequently, hypertension often goes undetected, with only half of those affected being aware of their condition. Even fewer individuals, approximately 1 in 5, take effective measures to control their blood pressure.

The Development of Chronic Blood Pressure

Recent scientific studies (1) suggest that chronic high blood pressure is caused by the hardening of arteries, which occurs due to the accumulation of oxidized cholesterol on blood vessel walls. Cholesterol plays a vital role in repairing damaged blood vessels, making an adequate amount beneficial. High cholesterol, as long as it is of the right type, does not negatively impact health or lead to hardened arteries and high blood pressure. Therefore, maintaining a balanced ratio of LDL and HDL cholesterol is crucial for optimal health.

LDL (low-density lipoprotein) cholesterol is believed to be deposited in blood vessels for repair of microscopic damage, while HDL (high-density lipoprotein) subsequently dismantles the LDL cholesterol plaques once the repair is complete. When LDL cholesterol becomes oxidized, a process involving damage caused by free radicals, the delicate balance between these two types of cholesterol is disrupted. Free radicals are highly reactive molecules that strip electrons from healthy molecules, rendering them damaged and oxidized. An excess of free radicals in the body that the body is not able to mitigate on its own is called oxidative stress.

A familiar example of oxidation can be seen in rancid oils, where prolonged exposure to air leads to the formation of sticky, pungent compounds. Rancid fats and oils are produced by oxidizing agents in the air such as oxygen and other molecules, and is sped up by light and heat. After oxidation, rancid fats and oils become free radicals themselves, oxidizing other lipids in the body and causing a chain reaction of oxidation. Consequently, this process results in the accumulation of sticky, oxidized cholesterol in the blood vessels over years of poor dietary choices. HDL cholesterol is unable to remove oxidized cholesterol, and the cycle continues unless dietary adjustments and smart supplementation are introduced to restore cholesterol to its healthy, unoxidized form.

Understanding the Oxidation Process

Rancid oils (2) are typically responsible for oxidizing cholesterol in our diet. However, the oils we consume, such as olive, sunflower, walnut, and commonly referred to as "liquid vegetable oil," don't have to be old, pungent, or sticky to cause harm. Detecting dangerous oil solely by taste and smell is challenging. Instead, we can make informed choices when purchasing oils and learn how to cook with them correctly.

Oils are vulnerable to oxidation when exposed to heat, light, and air. As soon as oils are pressed and exposed to light and air, the oxidation process begins. Therefore, it's advisable to seek the freshest possible oil and opt for low-heat extraction methods such as cold pressing, which keeps the extraction process at lower temperatures. Look for the phrase "cold press" on the label, and consider purchasing local oils as they are typically fresher since they don't undergo extended travel before reaching store shelves.

When cooking, it's recommended to minimize the use of oils. Instead, consider using substitutes like coconut oil, lard, ghee, or butter. If you must sprinkle olive oil on your roast potatoes, include rosemary, either fresh or dried. Rosemary offers protective properties against oil oxidation. Infusing your oil with rosemary by adding a few sprigs to the bottle is another option, but ensure the rosemary is clean and dry to avoid introducing water, which can lead to mold formation.

The Best Supplements to Lower Blood Pressure Naturally

Now that you understand how to make simple dietary changes to reduce oxidative stress in the body, it's time to equip your body with powerful herbs and vitamins that fight free radicals and lower blood pressure. I personally did an extensive research on the best brands that create supplements that are high quality, better digestible, and that work the best. These antioxidants aid in restoring your cholesterol balance and lowering blood pressure naturally by promoting flexible, healthy blood vessels.

1. Olive Leaf Extract by Island Nutrition: Olive leaf extract is an excellent supplement for everyone, as it is rich in antioxidants oleuropein and hydroxytyrosol. Hydroxytyrosol, although less known, is 30 times more potent than vitamin C.

2. PeptAce Fish Peptides: Next on the list is fish peptides. Fish peptides have been shown in scientific studies to reduce blood pressure by lowering hormones that increase blood pressure due to various factors such as stress. They also have a notable antioxidant activity. Fish peptides may keep blood pressure from spiking throughout the day.

2. PeptAce Fish Peptides: Next on the list is fish peptides. Fish peptides have been shown in scientific studies to reduce blood pressure by lowering hormones that increase blood pressure due to various factors such as stress. They also have a notable antioxidant activity. Fish peptides may keep blood pressure from spiking throughout the day.

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Mark Spenser |

Mark Spenser is a local NY resident and an avid geek. When he's not rediscovering his island state, he enjoys spending time at TechPhlox and review latest tech's world products and news. You can follow him on Twitter @MarkSpenser

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